Be passive – be active

A few months ago I wrote a short entry about using intuition in your yoga practice. Sometimes it can useful to simply put your mat on the floor and start doing some yoga, and see where that leads you. Respond to your body and your mind and let them direct you.

I’m often surprised by what I end up doing when I take this approach, rather than determining the course of my practice consciously at the beginning. If I set myself a conscious direction, then I may end up focussing on particular poses (standing, forward bends) or I may try to deal with something that’s a source of frustration, such as a lack of flexibility in my quads. I think this is mostly influenced by the classes I go to.

The yoga classes I go to are almost exclusively Iyengar. So they’re quite physical and focus on correct alignment in asana. That’s not to say they’re not relaxing. I often find that I’m physically tired at the end of a class which helps me relax deeply in Savasana. But my yoga journey didn’t start with Iyengar. It started with Hatha yoga and Sivananda Yoga – echoes of which continue to resonate in my practice.

Hatha yoga is really a term that covers all physical yoga. Iyengar, Ashtanga, Viniyoga – they are all physical disciplines and so they can all be considered Hatha yoga. Sivananda would come under this heading as well, but Sivananda is really very quiet and gentle compared to Iyengar and Ashtanga.

I think that yoga is a mixture of being active and being passive. The practice of asana is there to help develop the physical strength, stamina and control to help the practitioner to sit comfortably for periods of time where the breath and being quiet is the focus.

When I decide to approach my home practice without any conscious intent, other than practising yoga, I now find that I start and end with a few minutes sitting cross-legged, head bowed forward, relaxing and trying to just focus on my breath and connect with the present. When I get it right (I’m not sure if the idea of right and wrong is really appropriate here) it’s a wonderful feeling – a clear, still mind which isn’t distracted by external or internal events.

Hatha is a word made up of two terms from Sanskrit: Ha which can mean Sun – think activity, physically demanding poses and; Tha which can mean Moon – think passivity, restful and recuperative poses. If you practice a phyiscal form of yoga it’s important, I think, to include elements of both in your practice, whether that’s a conscious decision or not.

170718 Grounding

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